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196885_120491338028496_6089533_nOur church is a multicultural group of people that form a family called Brentwood Park Alliance Church.  We believe that God loves everyone, has shown his love for us through Jesus Christ, and wants to help us live more meaningful and fulfilling lives.  We would love to have you visit our church on a Sunday or drop in to one of the activities that we have during the week.

Worship Services – Sundays at 10:30am

A time of worship and a practical message from God’s Word.  Our Sunday morning services are casual and easily understandable.

We have high-quality programs for children and youth during the service.


Please contact us if you have any questions or if you need help.

Don Dyck                                           Ron Hunka

Lead Pastor                                      Associate Pastor


Brentwood Park Alliance Church

1410 Delta Avenue, Burnaby, BC, Canada, V5B 3G2

Telephone: 604.291.1635

Email: office@brentwoodchurch.ca


Find the most recent study notes and audio of Sunday studies below:

February 19, 2017 – A Question of Identity

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Speaker: Don Dyck

Study Series: (Re)Discovering Jesus

Study #60: A Question of Identity

Scripture: Luke 20:41-21:4 (all Scripture links go to BibleGateway.com)

rediscoveringjesus

audio

Link to Podcast

For thought and reflection

  • All of us put on “masks” to one extent or another when we go to work, go to school, go to meetings of various kinds, and, yes, even when we go to church! So…
    • Who are you when you go home at the end of the day?
    • What is the gap between “what you see” and “what you get”?
    • What about your relationship with others:   How has your understanding, or impression, of another person changed after you got to know them better – perhaps getting to know them more for who they really are rather for who you thought them to be, or wanted them to be?
  • *A thought to consider throughout this study
    • not all is as it appears or seems to be!

Context of Luke 20:41 – 21:4 → Setting the scene

  • Jesus has been teaching in temple courts – Luke 20:1
  • On one occasion his authority was challenged by a delegation from the religious leadership (Sanhedrin) – Luke 20:1-8
  • Another challenge was presented to Jesus through a question about paying taxes to Caesar – Luke 20:20-26
  • A further challenged was posed by the Sadducees about the reasonableness of the resurrection – Luke 20:27-38
  • His response is applauded by some of the teachers of the law (who probably were Pharisees and were in opposition to the Sadducees) – Luke 20:39
    • it is to this group then that Jesus very likely turns and addresses a question of his own (see Luke 20:41)
      • Background to the question
        • the ongoing development of the belief in the Messiah (Christ – anointed one) who, was believed to be the coming king, in the line of David, through whom God would deliver Israel from the oppression of her enemies and restore them as a free nation under the rule of God
          • There was no single fully agreed on teaching and expectations varied accordingly
          • An appeal was made to various texts from their Scriptures (the Old Testament in our Bible) among which Psalm 110 was one (quoted and referred to here by Jesus)
          • The question Jesus raises – which remains a mystery and unanswered until after the resurrection – brings out the tension between the Messiah as David’s son (human heir) which was commonly believed to be the case and David’s lord (one who is exalted and greater than David)
          • Jesus was continually pushing his disciples to radically change their perspective
            • here he asks a question that cannot be answered within their understood terms of the Messiah
              • *Note:   you can have the right answer to the question, “Who is Jesus?” but have a misunderstanding of what that means.

Jesus is who he says he is

There is integrity between his life and his teaching

His life is in many ways the message of the gospel (the good news of the kingdom of God)

Jesus lives the gospel – is in the incarnation of the gospel

  • That stands in contrast to the teachers of the law and other religious leaders in his time (Luke 20:45-47)
  • Jesus’ warning about the religious leaders
    • notice location (the temple courts), who is present (“all the people” and very likely the religious leaders!), and who is addressed (“his disciples”)
  • “flowing robes”
    • outward appearances
  • “greeted in the marketplaces”
    • public recognition
  • “important seats in the synagogue”
    • religious positions
  • “places of honor at banquets”
    • prestige
  • “lengthy prayers”
    • pseudo-spirituality
  • “devour widows houses”
    • who they really are – greedy people who use others, and God, for their own benefit
  • A contrast to the religious leaders
    • a poor widow (notice the contrast with “the rich”) offering her gift in the temple (Luke 21:1-4)
      • Note:   Jesus does not call down or condemn being rich or wealthy (nor does he glorify poverty) but rather the lack of generosity of those who have so much
        • the problem is not in what we possess but when we become possessed by our possessions

Taking it home → teaching points and their application to our lives

  • Living as followers of Jesus in the “upside down” kingdom of God
    • Values that are in contrast and conflict with those of the social, economic and cultural environment of the world around us
    • Living out these values is only consistently possible as we experience a shift in our perspective and orientation to life
  • Do we come to Jesus so he can serve our purposes, or to serve his purposes?

Study Questions for Personal Follow-Up and Group Discussion

1) Connecting with Your Story

  • All of us put on “masks” to one extent or another when we go to work, go to school, go to meetings of various kinds, and, yes, even when we go to church! So…
    • What “masks” are you most likely to put on? Why?
    • Who are you when you go home at the end of the day?
    • What is the gap between “what you see” and “what you get”?
    • What about your relationship with others:
      • How has your understanding, or impression, of another person changed after you got to know them better – perhaps getting to know them more for who they really are rather for who you thought them to be, or wanted them to be?

2) Quick Review

  • Looking back at your notes from this week’s study, was there a particular point, verse or comment that caught your attention, challenged you, or raised a question?

3) Digging Deeper

  • a)  The understanding of who the Messiah would be, and what he would be like, was one which had been gradually developing over the years (centuries) following the exile in Babylon and subsequent return. In many ways it was much like a polaroid picture that gradually becomes more clearly defined as it is exposed to light.
    • Key to the development of this understanding was the interpretation of various texts from their Scriptures (the Old Testament in our Bibles today.)
    • Two texts that were often referred to – by Jesus himself as well as others – were Psalm 110 and Daniel 7. Read these texts and consider how they would have led to who the Messiah was and how their misinterpretation may have blinded people to realizing that Jesus was the Messiah.
      • Psalm 110
      • Daniel 7:13-14 (avoid getting caught up in trying to interpret all the symbolic language in Daniel’s vision)
  • b)  Psalm 110 is one of the most frequently quoted or referred to texts from the Old Testament in the New Testament.
  • c)  Jesus gave out different invitations to come to him often describing himself in different ways.

4) Taking It Home

  • Review the “Taking It Home” part of your Study Notes. What changes are you making in your life as a result of this week’s study as you come to understand better who Jesus is and what it means to be his follower?